Exercise | Slimberry
Archive for the Exercise Category

Metabolic Syndrome

Following is an article by Dr. Joseph Mercola highlighting metabolic syndrome or the beginning of insulin resistance or diabetes symptoms.  Lifestyle changes–diet and exercise, can often bring one back from the brink of type II diabetes.  This requires patience and determination on the part of the person who is headed in this direction.  Chaning one's eating habits and getting exercise are the means by which the body can become sensitive to insulin again.  There is a supplement I take that was givent to me by my healthcare practitioner to help resensitize my body to insulin. It is from metagenics and can be purchased on Amazon with this link.  It is also available on vitacost.com if you like their site.

Here is the article:

Metabolic syndrome — a group of symptoms including diabetes, pre-diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol that increases the risk of heart disease — is no longer thought to be caused primarily by abdominal fat.

Instead, researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have determined, via new imaging technologies, that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle leads to changes in energy storage, leading to metabolic syndrome.

Insulin resistance, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to the hormone insulin, occurs in skeletal muscle when the muscles are no longer able to make glycogen, a form of stored carbohydrate, from food energy. In turn, insulin resistance in skeletal muscle promotes an increase in fats in the bloodstream, which leads to metabolic syndrome.

Using magnetic resonance imaging techniques, the researchers were able to determine that insulin-sensitive individuals in their study converted carbohydrate energy (from eating a high-carb meal) into glycogen that was stored in the liver and muscle.

Among insulin-resistant individuals, however, the carbohydrate energy was rerouted to liver fat production. The process elevated the participants’ triglycerides in the blood by as much as 60 percent while lowering HDL (good) cholesterol by 20 percent. This occurred even though the participants were young and lean, with no excess of abdominal fat.

More than 50 million Americans suffer from metabolic syndrome, and half of the population is predisposed to it.

The researchers pointed out that there is good news to their findings: insulin resistance in skeletal muscle can be treated with a simple method, exercise.

For the full article, use this link:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2007/07/18/insulin-resistance-not-belly-fat-to-blame-for-metabolic-syndrome.aspx

Four Other Critical Factors for Achieving Optimal Health

By Dr. Mercola

Four Other Critical Factors for Achieving Optimal Health

Choosing which foods to eat is important, but other lifestyle factors must be addressed as well. Besides making better food choices, there are four other key factors you must consider if you want to achieve your optimal level of health.

    1. Exercise: Exercise creates the same mood-elevating chemicals that sugar does—but with positive metabolic effects. Exercise helps metabolize your stress hormones, reduces hunger, improves sleep, strengthens bones and joints, and causes your body to release growth hormone—and many other health benefits.
    2. Detoxification/Cleansing: As you burn off body fat, you must also detoxify, because most chemicals are lipophilic (fat-loving) and are lodged in fat cells. If you don’t do something to remove these toxins from your body while losing weight, toxins can be reabsorbed into your bloodstream and potentially cause health problems.

Fortunately, your body will detoxify itself if there is no toxicity coming in. Chlorophyll-rich foods such as organic green vegetables, gelatinous plant foods like aloe and chia seeds, seaweeds, chlorella, cilantro and parsley can help with this. Make sure to drink plenty of pure water, as this is essential to your body’s cleansing processes. Juicing may also be of benefit. Avoid all chemicals, additives, and preservatives. If a product’s shelf life is longer than your life, don’t eat it!

    1. Sleep: Sleep allows your body to repair and rebuild. Deep sleep is a great way to neutralize stress hormones. Stress increases fluid retention—you can gain two pounds in body fluids just from one night of poor sleep due to stress.
    2. Stress Management: Stress changes your body chemistry, and will prompt you to eat, out of your body’s not knowing what else to do. It’s one of your body’s ways of protecting you. Stress raises your levels of cortisol and epinephrine, which can result in weight gain. If you don’t believe this, just talk to anyone taking prednisone, a pharmaceutical steroid similar to cortisol. They often gain 20 to 30 pounds, no matter what they’re eating.

My favorite overall tool to manage stress is EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique), which is like acupuncture without the needles. It’s a handy tool for unloading emotional baggage quickly and painlessly, and so easy that children can learn it. And it’s FREE! Also free, laughter is great medicine because it decreases stress chemicals and pain.

Another powerful tool for creating positive change in your life is visualization, which is the “language” of the subconscious. When you create a visual image of how you’d like to look or feel, your subconscious will understand and begin to help you by making the needed biochemical and neurological changes.

These are just some of the suggestions that will help you along your way. I recommend taking the time to watch Hungry for Change, which offers you even more information than what I’ve presented above. Remember that if you treat your body well, it will return the favor.

References:


Help Your DNA Through Exercise

By Dr. Mercola

New research published in the journal Cell Metabolism shows that when healthy but inactive men and women exercise even briefly, it produces an immediate change in their DNAi.

Although the underlying genetic code in human muscle doesn’t change, exercise causes important structural and chemical changes to the DNA molecules within those muscles.

This contraction-induced gene activation, which modifies DNA at precise locations, appears to be early events leading to the genetic reprogramming of muscle for strength, and to the structural and metabolic benefits of exercise.

According to Science Dailyii:

“The DNA changes in question are known as epigenetic modifications and involve the gain or loss of chemical marks on DNA over and above the familiar sequence of As, Gs, Ts, and Cs.

The new study shows that the DNA within skeletal muscle taken from people after a burst of exercise bears fewer chemical marks (specifically methyl groups) than it did before exercise.

Those changes take place in stretches of DNA that are involved in turning “on” genes important for muscles’ adaptation to exercise…

Broadly speaking, the findings offer more evidence that our genomes are much more dynamic than they are often given credit for.”

Exercise Changes Your Biochemistry

Previous studies have identified and measured the biochemical changes that occur during exercise and found alterations in more than 20 different metabolitesiii. Some of these compounds help you burn calories and fat, while others help stabilize your blood sugar, among other things.

What all of this tells us is that exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy weight creates a positive feedback loop. One of the key health benefits of exercise is that it helps normalize your glucose and insulin levels, by optimizing insulin receptor sensitivity. This is perhaps the most important factor for optimizing your overall health and preventing disease of all kinds, from diabetes, to heart disease, to cancer, and everything in between.