Metabolic Syndrome | Slimberry
Archive for the Metabolic Syndrome Category

Prediabetes and High Fructose Corn Syrup

This a real eye opening article on Dr. Mercola’s site.  I know HFCS was not healthy from what I have researched before.  I am now off sugar, again, and feeling and looking much better.  But HFCS evidently can be really deadly.  Have a read:

 

All Calories and not created Equal:

Perhaps one of the most powerful details to emerge from Dr. Johnson’s investigations is that the old adage “a calorie is a calorie” is patently false. Furthermore, the idea that in order to lose weight all you have to do is expend more calories than you consume is also false…  The research clearly demonstrates that even if you control the number of calories you eat, if those calories come from fructose, you are at increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, or prediabetes, which includes:

  • Insulin resistance
  • Fatty liver
  • High blood pressure
  • High triglycerides

Conventional thinking tells us that metabolic syndrome is the outcome of obesity, which is simply the result of eating too many calories and not exercising enough. The idea that this is incorrect continues to be met with great resistance.

However, Dr. Johnson’s research shows that a high fructose diet is the key to developing metabolic syndrome, and as soon as you throw fructose into the mix, “calories in versus calories out” is no longer a functional equation…

“[O]ne group [of animals] is getting a number of calories that an animal would normally eat, but it’s high in fructose. Another group will get the same amount of food – exactly the same amount of food, but with a different carbohydrate, like glucose.

It’s the fructose-fed rats that develop metabolic syndrome. Suddenly they get fatty liver. They get visceral fat. Their blood pressure goes up. Their triglycerides are high. They actually develop all these features, whereas the glucose-fed rats don’t—and they’re eating the same number of calories!

We even did a study two years ago that was even more remarkable. We took laboratory animals and we put them on a diet. We gave them 90 percent of what they normally eat, but one diet had 40 percent sugar. (Now remember, some kids are eating 30 percent of their diet as sugar right now)… The control rats were eating the same [amount of calories] in starch. What was amazing was that the sugar-fed animals developed fatty liver – like massive fatty liver – and even became diabetic. The control animals did not.

There’s something special about fructose. It’s not just a calorie. This led us to try to figure out why… It was a big challenge to figure out how fructose was causing diabetes and obesity through a mechanism that doesn’t really require excessive calorie intake.”

 

For the rest of the article, click here.

 

Metabolic Syndrome

Following is an article by Dr. Joseph Mercola highlighting metabolic syndrome or the beginning of insulin resistance or diabetes symptoms.  Lifestyle changes–diet and exercise, can often bring one back from the brink of type II diabetes.  This requires patience and determination on the part of the person who is headed in this direction.  Chaning one's eating habits and getting exercise are the means by which the body can become sensitive to insulin again.  There is a supplement I take that was givent to me by my healthcare practitioner to help resensitize my body to insulin. It is from metagenics and can be purchased on Amazon with this link.  It is also available on vitacost.com if you like their site.

Here is the article:

Metabolic syndrome — a group of symptoms including diabetes, pre-diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol that increases the risk of heart disease — is no longer thought to be caused primarily by abdominal fat.

Instead, researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have determined, via new imaging technologies, that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle leads to changes in energy storage, leading to metabolic syndrome.

Insulin resistance, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to the hormone insulin, occurs in skeletal muscle when the muscles are no longer able to make glycogen, a form of stored carbohydrate, from food energy. In turn, insulin resistance in skeletal muscle promotes an increase in fats in the bloodstream, which leads to metabolic syndrome.

Using magnetic resonance imaging techniques, the researchers were able to determine that insulin-sensitive individuals in their study converted carbohydrate energy (from eating a high-carb meal) into glycogen that was stored in the liver and muscle.

Among insulin-resistant individuals, however, the carbohydrate energy was rerouted to liver fat production. The process elevated the participants’ triglycerides in the blood by as much as 60 percent while lowering HDL (good) cholesterol by 20 percent. This occurred even though the participants were young and lean, with no excess of abdominal fat.

More than 50 million Americans suffer from metabolic syndrome, and half of the population is predisposed to it.

The researchers pointed out that there is good news to their findings: insulin resistance in skeletal muscle can be treated with a simple method, exercise.

For the full article, use this link:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2007/07/18/insulin-resistance-not-belly-fat-to-blame-for-metabolic-syndrome.aspx